Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Fight To Save The Temple Site of Artemis Agrotera

With the "Greek" Orthodox church having its hand in things that go on in the Greek government, and considering their history of the mass extermination and persecution of the Hellenic culture, it's no wonder that more and more ancient Greek archaeological sites are coming into danger while the Greek government has turned a blind eye since 1964, despite pleas from archaeologists to protect this ancient site in question.

The famous and significant archaeological site in Athens of the Temple of Artemis Agrotera (the Huntress) has officially been abandoned by the State to allow new buildings constructed on top of it. The temple was turned into a Christian church in the 5th century CE, or if we want to say it honestly without sugarcoating, sacked and forced. And now that the Christians are of course done with it, it's left to be destroyed the rest of the way. The reason it's important for those of us who are still loyal to the old Gods and old Hellas to preserve these ancient sites, no matter how small or ruined, is because they give testament to our continued spirit and history, and this is seen by the eyes of the modern world. Not to mention the enormous amount of history and finds that may still be buried beneath the soil of the sites. This is all worth more than the wallets of modern money grubbers or developers. 

The good thing is that there is still time to change course for the heritage site. The Greek government can still section it off, provide it the proper protections, and relinquish it as an observable site for times to come.

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If you would like to voice your concerns to the Greek government on the matter, you can contact parliament and tell them that this is not ok. The email address is: infopar@parliament.gr, maybe even start your own petitions if you can get them to the Greek government. Tell them it's time to stop forgetting where they came from, and to be proud of the ancient Greece that built the Western Civilization of today.

In the Goodness of the Gods,
Chris Aldridge.