Saturday, October 14, 2017

Fleeting Feelings


Ancient Greek religion teaches us that we can't always rely on our own personal instincts or feelings; that we sometimes have to examine things in factual detail. At times, our instincts can be right, but other times, they can be wrong, especially if we are too hasty with them. Oedipus ended up killing His own father in a dispute because of His quick emotions, not realizing who the man was until it was too late. Greek mythology is filled with examples of people who suffered because they automatically listened to their gut, or in other words, their carnal side.

One morning, I woke up and played poker with myself and got four queens. I thought it was a day of luck for me; I just felt it deep inside. So I drove down to the convenient store at dawn and bought three lottery tickets; costing me $12 total. I even invoked the blessings of Hermes and Tykhe before I entered the establishment. When it was over, I won back the money I had spent, but nothing more. In short, I lost even though I was sure that I was going to be a winner that day.

Now, what was the important lesson the Gods taught me that morning? The lesson was that there are times when your own assurance is not correct; when what you believe to be lovingly true can be completely untrue. You see, if I had examined the odds of the lottery and how many times I played poker before I got four queens, I may have stayed home because I would have realized that my luck really isn't all that good in either case.

Some people might ask if I found myself upset with the Gods after this experience, and the answer is absolutely not. Before they even sent me to learn this lesson, the Gods knew I'd never turn on them. They knew I'd always love them, and of course I did. Perhaps I grew to love them even more because I had gained another level of humanely wisdom in my life. 

In the Goodness of the Gods,
Chris.

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